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08/22/2017
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|| 08/14/2017 ||
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|| 07/29/2017 ||
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Passchendaele 2017 - Discover all projects and events that remember 100 years Battle of Passchendaele in Zonnebeke/Passchendaele
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Recreated in 3D: the basement room - where the Russian royals were murdered
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|| 07/26/2017 ||
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Pictures in the attic -
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|| 07/19/2017 ||
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Third Reich in Ruins -
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|| 07/14/2017 ||
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|| 06/13/2017 ||
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1927 news report: Donald Trump's dad arrested in KKK brawl with cops - Happy 90th anniversary of Fred Trump's arrest at a KKK rally!
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|| 05/10/2017 ||
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The Drive of Our Lives - The Heyday of the Motorway Service Station |
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There Once Was a Dildo in Nantucket | Literary Hub - On the wives of whalers and their dildos, aka "he's-at-homes"
From Nony
|| 04/20/2017 ||
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Lukas Art in Flanders - Lukas Art in Flanders is the online image library of Flemish art heritage: creating, managing and distributing images from Flemish museums, churches, cathedral and heritage institutions worldwide.
From Nony
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History
|| 04/12/2017 ||
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Chernobyl & Pripyat -
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100 Years Ago, the United States Entered World War I - The Atlantic - On April 6, 1917, the United States congress voted to formally enter World War I. More than two years of war had been waged in Europe, as the U.S. tried to remain neutral. In early 1917, German submarine attacks on all ships bound for England resumed, adding to the building pressure to join the war against the German Empire and the Central Powers, which led President Woodrow Wilson to ask Congress to declare war.
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|| 04/04/2017 ||
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Renaissance Art -
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Censored Photographs of FDR's Japanese Concentration Camps - The military seized her photographs, quietly depositing them in the National Archives, where they remained mostly unseen and unpublished until 2006
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That Time American Women Lost Their Citizenship Because - In March of 1907, Congress passed the Expatriation Act, which decreed, among other things, that U.S. women who married non-citizens were no longer Americans. If their husband later became a naturalized citizen, they could go through the naturalization process to regain citizenship.
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|| 03/13/2017 ||
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|| 03/07/2017 ||
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Hooray for Big Hair! -
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Donald and Ivana Trump's Divorce: The Full Story | Vanity Fair - Unfortunately for Donald and Ivana Trump, all that glittered wasn’t gold. But the reign of New York’s self-created imperial couple isn’t over yet. Donald’s Midas touch may be tarnished, but the banks are still throwing money at him, while Ivana is busy brokering a future of her own. Marie Brenner reports on how the Trumps are still going for it all.
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|| 01/26/2017 ||
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Remember when -
From Olga
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Ku Klux Klan marching down Pennsylvania Avenue, Washington, - History going to repeat itself?
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Israel reveals eerie collection of Neolithic 'spirit' masks | The Times of Israel - Ahead of Purim, 12 relics of 9,000-year-old ancestor worship from Judean Desert, Hills to go on display at Israel Museum for first time
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45 years of terrorist attacks in Europe, visualized - Washington Post - The attacks can happen almost anywhere: In a holiday market outside a historic church in Berlin, on the street during a national holiday in France, in an airplane over Scotland or during the first day of school in a small town in Russia.
From Nony
|| 12/17/2016 ||
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History
|| 12/01/2016 ||
History
National Archives at Atlanta - Aurelia S. Browder, et al. v. W.A. Gayle, et al. was the landmark court case that accompanied the Montgomery Bus Boycott and led to the Supreme Court decision declaring segregated buses to be unconstitutional. Although not a listed plaintiff, Rosa Parks' police report, fingerprints, and bus diagram were exhibits in the case.
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W. E. B. Du Bois's Modernist Data Visualizations of Black Life - For the 1900 Exposition Universelle in Paris, African American activist and sociologist W. E. B. Du Bois led the creation of over 60 charts, graphs, and maps that visualized data on the state of black life. The hand-drawn illustrations were part of an “Exhibit of American Negroes,” which Du Bois, in collaboration with Thomas J. Calloway and Booker T. Washington, organized to represent black contributions to the United States at the world’s fair.
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|| 11/17/2016 ||
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World War I in Photos: Technology - The Atlantic - When Europe's armies first marched to war in 1914, some were still carrying lances on horseback. By the end of the war, rapid-fire guns, aerial bombardment, armored vehicle attacks, and chemical weapon deployments were commonplace. Any romantic notion of warfare was blu
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From Bullet Holes to An Honoring Ground: Northern Cheyenne Breakout Monument Completed - ICTMN.com - The Northern Cheyenne Breakout Monument honors the tribal members who tried to break out from imprisonment at the U.S. Army outpost at Camp Robinson, now Fort Robinson, in western Nebraska during the winter of 1878-1879. More than 60 Cheyenne men, women and children were killed during the breakout following four days with no food or water, according to the Nebraska Historical Society.
From Nony
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Armored vehicles of the Wehrmacht, found decades later - Armored vehicles of the Wehrmacht, found decades later.
From Nony
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What they Wore to the Vanderbilt Ball: Inside the Photo Album - Like they do at prom, the guests of the 1883 Vanderbilt fancy dress ball each had the opportunity to have their photo taken at the event of the year, or perhaps the century. All of New York’s elite society turned up at the Fifth Avenue mega mansion dressed as pirates, goths, animals, gypsies and other inventive and slightly ridiculous get-ups.
From Nony
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Hand colored photographs capture Japanese life during the Meiji Period - Every once in awhile, whilst browsing through the vast digital archive that is Flickr, we stumble upon something downright gorgeous. Take today, for instance, when we somehow found ourselves gazing in awe at this vast, colorful collection of Japanese photos from the Meiji Era. The photo collection in question was taken in 1890 by the prominent Japanese photographer Kusakabe Kimbei.
From Nony
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Banned '90s Walmart shirt is relevant again thanks to Hillary Clinton - A T-shirt designer back in 1995 made a shirt that featured Margaret from the "Dennis the Menace" comic strip saying "Someday a woman will be PRESIDENT!" However, when one Walmart shopper was offended by the shirt's message, the store removed it from shelves.
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10 Dark Towers That Once Made The World's Bullets | Atlas Obscura - Who knew munitions factories could be so lovely?The little metal shot balls that were once the standard projectile for all manner of guns used to be made using little more than heat and gravity, in tall spires called shot towers. Most such towers operated in essentially the same way: melted lead would be poured through a funnel at the top of the tower and drip down the length of the tower, naturally forming into little spheres as it fell and cooled.
From Nony
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History
LittlePawz - Supposedly, this is a historical photo of Air... - Supposedly, this is a historical photo of Air Florida Flight 90 crashing into 14th Street bridge over Potomac River on January 13, 1982 (yeah, yeah, I know, it’s photoshop all the way :)
From Nony
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Why We Are Afraid, A 1400 Year Secret, by Dr Bill Warner - YouTube - A 45 minute video on why the world seems, as the speaker puts it, "afraid" of Muslims.
From Surfer
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Bikini introduced - Jul 05, 1946 - HISTORY.com - On July 5, 1946, French designer Louis Reard unveils a daring two-piece swimsuit at the Piscine Molitor, a popular swimming pool in Paris. Parisian showgirl Micheline Bernardini modeled the new fashion, which Reard dubbed “bikini,” inspired by a news-making U.S. atomic test that took place off the Bikini Atoll in the Pacific Ocean earlier that week.
From Nony
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10 Documents With A Profound Influence On History - Listverse - History can prove hard to uncover. When delving back hundreds or even thousands of years into our past, we have to make do with whatever bits and pieces we find, hoping they can provide us with an accurate picture of a time long gone. Sometimes, we get lucky, though. Occasionally, we uncover documents that detail some of the most notable events in history.
From X Isle
|| 06/22/2016 ||
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History
Workers will soon enter the tomb of Jesus - Workers will soon enter the tomb of Jesus — and repair the ‘Holy Stone’ with titanium bolts
From Supreeth
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The Married Woman Who Kept Her Lover in the Attic | Atlas Obscura - Dolly Oesterreich, her "Bat Man," and one of the strangest sex scandals ever.
From Nony
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The Surprisingly Short History Of The Plus Sign | Co.Design | business design - Before the 16th century, most math equations were written as metered verse. Thank god for graphic-design-inclined mathematicians.
From Surfer
|| 05/31/2016 ||
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Historical Times -
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|| 04/25/2016 ||
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NSFW - Grandma Did It -
From Nony
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|| 04/24/2016 ||
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NSFW - RetroFucking -
From Nony
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How Scams Worked In The 1800s : NPR History Dept. : NPR - These days we are constantly warned of scams and schemes designed to hoodwink us. The FBI sends out scam alerts from its Internet Crime Center. The Federal Trade Commission cautions against all kinds of fraudulence, from the recent Anthem Hack Attack to IRS impostors. And this week the AARP Fraud Watch Network is reminding people of Valentine's Day scams, including fake florists and cash-on-delivery hornswogglers.
From Nony
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|| 04/22/2016 ||
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Advertising Pics -
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Folies Bergere in 1937 Photography Memories - NSFW in certain quarters ...
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Here's The Real Story Of Why We Celebrate 4/20 - The origin of 420 had nothing to do with a police code, though the San Rafael part was dead-on. A group of five San Rafael High School friends known as the Waldos — by virtue of their chosen hangout spot, a wall outside the school — coined the term in 1971.
From X Isle
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New Evidence on When Bible Was Written: Ancient Shopping Lists - The New York Times - The study was based on a trove of about 100 letters inscribed in ink on pieces of pottery, known as ostracons, that were unearthed near the Dead Sea in an excavation of the Arad fort decades ago and dated from about 600 B.C.
From X Isle
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How to Mess with the Nazis: The CIA%u2019s Sabotage Manual for Ordinary Citizens | Messy Nessy Chic - Trolling the Nazis. Sounds like fun right? During World War II, the CIA put out the “Sabotage Field Manual”, which described innovative ways in which ordinary citizens could sabotage America’s enemies by doing a range of disruptive things from starting arguments to starting fires.
From Nony
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Hannibal's Famous Alps Crossing Revealed By Ancient Animal Poop | Popular Science - owels in the same areaOne of the astonishing things about Hannibal’s crossing of the Alps was that he was able to successfully move such a tremendous number of men and animals over such treacherous, unforgiving terrain. Conditions were likely terrible, and Inadequate clothing coupled with severe weather probably made it a harrowing experience for the average soldier. His army consisted of some 30,000 soldiers, 15,000 horses and at least 37 elephants.
From X Isle
History
Isaac Newton%u2019s Lost Alchemy Recipe Rediscovered - The legendary physicist tried for years to turn lead into gold—and may have used a newly recovered manuscript in his quest.
From X Isle
History
'Baby Hands' in Cave Paintings May Actually Belong to Lizards - Tiny hands — originally assumed to be those of very young children or infants — were stenciled inside the outlines of adult hands on the wall of the Wadi Sura II rock shelter some 8,000 years ago.
From X Isle
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|| 03/30/2016 ||
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ScanLines - i MAnAge to CREatE A fLickering sCAnLiNeS bAckGrounD FoR THe BLOg. i HoPE yOuR eYes WiLL Be bLEeding LikE miNE nOW :)
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Scans of King Tut's Tomb Reveal Hidden Rooms, Egypt's Antiquities Ministry Says - NBC News - CAIRO — Radar scans of King Tut's tomb have revealed two spaces on the north and east chambers of the pharaonic mausoleum that could contain the "discovery of the century," Egypt's antiquities ministry said Thursday.
From X Isle
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Science Answers An Age-Old Question: How Can You Spot A Pregnant T. Rex? - Scientists have discovered what they believe is a pregnant Tyrannosaurus Rex -- and it might even still contain dino DNA.Tests conducted on the fossilized femur of a 68-million-year-old T. Rex revealed the presence of medullary bone, or a type of bone that forms only in female birds before or during egg-laying, according to a news release from North Carolina State University.
From X Isle
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vintage everyday: 10 of the Most Famous Prostitutes in History - While most people are familiar with prominent historical figures like King Louis XV, Napoleon Bonaparte, and King Charles II, little is known about the mistresses who shared their beds and sometimes mothered their children. These 10 famous prostitutes made prominent names for themselves during their time, and many of them were respected models, entrepreneurs, artists, actresses, and explorers. Their lives were full of mystery, intrigue, and the occasional murder by erotic asphyxiation.
From Nony
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Amazing Mummies: King Tut's Great Grandparents - The mummy of King Tut's great grandfather, Yuya, is a stunning example of ancient Egyptian embalming. He and his wife were probably between 50 and 60 years old at the time of death. Like her husband, Tuyu was identified by inscriptions on funerary equipment. Hieroglyphs spell out her name and titles, which include dresser to the king, chantress of the god Amun, and lady of the harem of the god Min.
From X Isle
History
burglar alarm staircase | History Myths Debunked - It makes a great scene, doesn’t it? In the dead of night, a thief breaks quietly into the house. Sneaking up the stairs, he comes down hard on one foot when one of the stair risers is unexpectedly shorter than the rest. Thud! The noise wakes the household and the thief is caught!
From X Isle
History
4,000 year-old shipwreck belonging to Minoans found in Turkey - Daily Sabah - The shipwreck is thought to be used for trading purposes and is from the Minoan Civilization, which existed around 3650 to 1400 BCE.
From X Isle
History
In shards of glass, a new sign of how the enigmatic Easter Islanders met their demise - The Washington Post - Revised thinking about how the inhabitants of Easter Island came to their doom: disease and slave raids, not ecological collapse.
From X Isle
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|| 02/18/2016 ||
History
Historical Nonfiction -
From Nony
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Black History Month Magazines #4: The Crisis | Facebook - The Crisis was founded in 1910 by W.E.B. DuBois as the magazine of the NAACP. Within nine years it reached a circulation of 100,000. It was an important venue in its early days for African American authors, including Jean Toomer, Langston Hughes, Countee Cullen, and Jessie Fauset. Notable cover artists included Frank Walts and Aaron Douglas. A complete set of issues from 1910-22 is available at The Modernist
From Nony
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|| 02/07/2016 ||
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CV-16 -
From Nony
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Babylonian Astronomy Text Changes History - To track the gas giant’s path across the sky, the Babylonians used a geometric technique—the so-called trapezoid procedure—that’s a cornerstone of modern calculus
From Supreeth
|| 01/30/2016 ||
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|| 01/30/2016 ||
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|| 01/29/2016 ||
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History
|| 01/21/2016 ||
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History Museum -
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Jackie Kennedy believed LBJ had her husband killed according to tapes - Jackie Kennedy believed Lyndon B Johnson was behind the 1963 assassination of her husband President John F Kennedy. Kennedy, who later became Jackie Onassis, claimed that the Dallas murder was part of a larger conspiracy to allow Johnson to become American President in his own right.
From Popper
|| 01/11/2016 ||
History
Historical Artefact -
From Nony
|| 01/11/2016 ||
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History
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Check Out The Incredible Armored Trains Of WWI & WWII - Now the world has turned it’s attention on South-Western Poland in the hunt for the Lost Nazi (Armored) Train, let us take a look at armored trains that were used during WWI and WWII.
From Nony
History
Victorian Sex Was Bizarre And Filled With Contradictions - We all that know the Victorians were a bunch of uptight prudes. In the late-19th century, women weren’t even allowed to vote, so how enlightened could they really be? People back then probably got arrested at the beach for showing their knees, right? Actually, while the Victorians—like everybody before and since—had their hangups, their all-too-human sexuality tended to come out in ways that modern people find really bizarre. For example:
From Nony
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Climate change 'did not force Vikings to abandon Greenland in 15th century' | Environment | The Independent - “We have found no reason to believe that it was any more warmer at the start of the colonisation than at the end. It looks like the climate was by and large pretty stable. Other factors must have led to them leaving Greenland,” said Nicolas Young, a glacial geologsit at Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory in New York.
From Nony
|| 12/03/2015 ||
History
Hitler disguised - US Government mockups of how Hitler could have disguised himself (1940s)
From Nony
|| 11/26/2015 ||
History
Postcard Time Machine -
From Nony
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The Beached German Submarine U-118 at Hastings, England | Amusing Planet - In the morning of 15 April, 1919, the townsfolk of Hastings, in Sussex, on the south coast of England, woke up to an astonishing sight. A huge German U-boat had washed ashore right in front of the popular Queens Hotel. The wreck of the submarine became an overnight sensation, drawing in tourists from all over England, Wales and Scotland.
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First pants worn by horse riders 3,000 years ago | Science News - Two men whose remains were recently excavated from tombs in western China put their pants on one leg at a time, just like the rest of us. But these nomadic herders did so between 3,300 and 3,000 years ago, making their trousers the oldest known examples of this innovative apparel, a new study finds.
From Nony
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|| 11/13/2015 ||
History
Submarine Photo Index -
From Nony
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History
zero focus: Kids at War, Paris, 1915.   Rare Color... - Rare Color Photographs from the First World War, Paris, August 1915: men are at war and women are working. Far from their parents, the children of the rue Greneta play at battle.
From Nony
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Beautiful color photographs of England during the 1920s - The summers seemed brighter, the weather warmer, the days more leisurely. The First World War—”the war to end all wars”—was long over and the 1920s began as a decade of great prosperity. But by the 1925, the years of plenty were over. The gap between rich and poor widened, with unemployment rife and beggars—many old soldiers—a common sight on the cities’ streets.
From Nony
History
10 Famous People Who Vanished Without a Trace - Neatorama - Some mysteries linger for years, and the longer they go unsolved, the more likely they never will be solved. People go missing, and are sometimes found, sometimes a body is recovered, and sometimes we never have a clue as to what happened. Some of those people were pretty well-known in life, like New York socialite Dorothy Arnold, who disappeared in 1910.
From Nony
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Why experts say a $2 photo from a California junk shop is the holy grail of Western Americana - As legend has it, Billy the Kid was a cold-blooded outlaw and cattle rustler who lived hard and died young. Less legendary, it turns out, is the fact that the kid — a.k.a. William Bonney — was a player of the popular 19th century British pastime known as croquet. That’s according to only the second photo ever to be confirmed of the infamous outlaw, whose short life and mysterious death continue to fascinate historians and bewitch investigators.
From Nony
|| 10/21/2015 ||
History
Gebirgsjäger - Militaria,& Military History,politics,Hitler-jugend,Bund deutscher madel & female political & civil organisations within the Third Reich,RADwJ,NS-Frauenschaft,lebensborn.
From Nony
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“Time Capsule” Apartment in Paris Found Untouched for 70 Years - When a 91-year-old woman died in 2010, her family discovered she had inherited an apartment in Paris from her grandmother. In 1942 she had abandoned it in perfectly preserved—and decorated—condition.
From Popper
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|| 10/17/2015 ||
History
ITS GONNA GET SPOOPY -
From Nony
|| 10/16/2015 ||
History
Schandmaskes / Masks of Shame - Do you know someone who is a gossip? Has one of your friends broken a social rule/expectation? Today's world doesn't really punish the gossip -- surely recent events with Perez Hilton have shown that. However, during the medieval period and the Renaissance, and even into the age of Early Modern Europe, there were methods, rituals, and punishments to control and condemn behavior.
From Nony
|| 10/14/2015 ||
History
All power to the Soviets! - Blog dedicated to the military history of former Eastern Bloc countries.
From Nony
|| 10/14/2015 ||
History
Museum of Artifacts -
From Nony
|| 10/14/2015 ||
History
HISTORY BETWEEN THE SHEETS - Blow jobs may seem as American as apple pie these days, but that wasn’t always the case. The act was taboo for centuries, and the term didn’t even enter our lexicon until the 1940s, when it referred primarily to a forbidden homosexual encounter. So whom do we have to thank for bringing oral sex out of the shadows and into the mainstream? Organized crime, it turns out. From Mario Puzo’s The Godfather to Deep Throat (a film bankrolled by the Colombo crime family), the mob ushered the job into heterosexual bedrooms across the country, where it has stayed firmly in hand ever since.
From Popper
History
Shooting Film: Interesting Contact Sheets of a Photo Session with John Lennon and Paul McCartney in 1965 - David Bailey is an English photographer who began snapping for British Vogue in the ’60s. Photographing the likes of Jean Shrimpton, The Beatles and Andy Warhol, Bailey captured the exciting and modern swinging ’60s fever that was gripping London and New York at the time, helping create icons out of It-girls and celebrity boys (apparently the English photographer in Blowup was based on his own ‘swinging’ adventures). As time went on, Bailey began shooting album covers for the Rolling Stones and Marianne Faithfull, a passion for music photography that still has taking portraits of stars today.
From Nony
|| 10/09/2015 ||
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Axis History -
From Nony
|| 10/06/2015 ||
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Once Upon a Town -
From Nony
|| 09/29/2015 ||
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Ultimate World War II -
From Nony
|| 09/29/2015 ||
History
Worlds' End -
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Plugged in early: Briggs had a hybrid in '70s - Long before the Toyota Prius was even imagined, a modest gasoline-electric automobile from Briggs
From Nony
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|| 09/20/2015 ||
History
Military and Aviation - All the interesting things related to land, naval and aerial engineering, with a focus on military applications, most is from the internet, but some is OC.
From Nony
|| 09/20/2015 ||
History
Can You Pass This Test From 1912? - Eight Grade Exam. American college graduates today can't pass it.
From Roddy
|| 09/18/2015 ||
History
Japanese WWII Blog - This blog in no way denies or supports the actions of the Japanese during the imperial era. It is purely for educational purposes.
From Nony
|| 09/17/2015 ||
History
interesting history -
From Nony
|| 09/17/2015 ||
History
The Iraq War - The images on this website are gut-wrenching. They show both the suffering of Americans and Iraqis. This horror is what American senators unanimously voted to continue. Even if you are an American with a weak stomach, it would be cowardly to avoid looking at what you voted for. If you can’t bear to look, skip the pictures and read the text and remember if you cannot bear to even look at the suffering, how dare you insist anyone else bear the reality of it.
From Nony
History
Civil war surgery: The grisly photos that show how wounded soldiers were treated | Daily Mail Online - When a soldier is injured on the battlefield today he can expect the most sophisticated first aid.But medical treatment for troops has not always been so advanced, as these incredible pictures from the American Civil War show, originally featured on cbsnews.com.The images take you back 150 years to show the kind of gruesome emergency surgery that wounded soldiers had come to expect.
From Nony
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History
100 Years Later, WWI Remains Found in Alps - A century since battles raged across northern Italy’s Alpine front during the First World War, remains believed to belong to a young soldier have been found. The skeleton was discovered by 57-year-old Livio De Francesco, near the summit of Costabella in Val di Fassa. Di Francesco has worked extensively to recover the remains of soldiers from along the mountains of the Great War.
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The Floating Catbox, =Operation Market Garden = September 17 - 25, 1944 - The plan was to take and hold strategic points with airborne troops and have the 30th Corps relieve the paratroopers with lightning-speed advances to eventually liberate the Netherlands and invade Germany. ‘Market’ is the code name for the initial paratroop landings and 'Garden’ is the subsequent advance of the 30th Corps. The entire operation failed due to the slower-than-expected advance of the 30th Corps and logistical problems on the Allied side. The airborne forces suffered very heavy casualties and had to be withdrawn and in doing so ended any chance of the war in Europe ending in 1944.
From Nony
|| 09/14/2015 ||
History
The Mysterious Desert Kites - In the 1920s, pilots of the Royal Air Force flying over the deserts of Israel, Jordan and Egypt saw strange line shapes in the ground that they named “Desert Kites” because their outlines, as seen from the air, reminded them of airborne kites. It was the first time the white men had seen these mysterious figures, although the local Bedouin knew them for thousands of years. They called them “Works of the Old Men”. Since the discovery, thousands of desert kites have been identified distributed throughout the Arabian and Sinai peninsulas and as far northward as southeastern Turkey.
From Nony
|| 09/14/2015 ||
History
Bunker Logic -
From Nony
|| 09/11/2015 ||
History
Timeline of the far future - A great Wikipedia browse for a bit.
From cw
History
1927 news report: Donald Trump's dad arrested in KKK brawl with cops - Boing Boing - In an article subtitled "Klan assails policeman", Fred Trump is named in among those taken in during a late May "battle" in which "1,000 Klansmen and 100 policemen staged a free-for-all." At least two officers were hurt during the event, after which the Klan's activities were denounced by the city's Police Commissioner, Joseph A. Warren.
From Nony
|| 09/04/2015 ||
History
Bagration Operation - Red Army's Key 15 Battles vs Nazi Germany and Japan
From Nony
History
Fabled Amber Room could be hidden inside Nazi treasure train - The Nazi gold train that made headlines last week could contain the legendary Amber Room, presented to Tsar Peter the Great by the King of Prussia, according to British author and journalist Tom Bower. Meanwhile, the Polish have lawyered up, staking a claim to the finds.
From Nony
|| 08/28/2015 ||
History
retrowar -
From Nony
History
Lone Sentry: World War II Photographs, Documents, and Research - Photographs, Documents, and Research on World War II
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|| 08/28/2015 ||
History
vintage pinball -
From Nony
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The Art Of Writing: The Joy Of Illustrated Letters (1800-1980) - Flashbak - Remember handwritten letters? Pretty much the only handwritten missives anyone gets today are birthday cards. But once upon a time, pen and paper were at technology’s bleeding edge. Together they created letters.
From Nony
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Cree Code Talkers: Documentary Explores Role of Canada's Unsung WWII Heroes - ICTMN.com - Code talkers in the United States have been storied, honored and lauded for their military contributions. But much less known, and barely recognized for their service by the Canadian government, were Cree code talkers from Canada who assisted the Allies in World War II.
From Nony
History
History
8 Rights Women Didn't Have a Century Ago - Women's rights are something we take for granted these days. Because it was all a long time ago that the suffragettes fought for the right to vote, wasn't it? However, women's rights still depend very much on where they live, and even some of the rights we take for granted were relatively recently achieved. Here are some of the women's rights that have been accomplished over the last 100 years or so …
From Nony
History
|| 07/25/2015 ||
History
Forgotten Weapons -
From Nony
|| 07/25/2015 ||
History
British Union of Fascists - In 1931 Oswald Mosley founded the New Party. Early supporters included John Strachey, John Becket, Harold Nicholson, Cyril Joad, William Joyce, Mary Richardson, William Allen, Robert Forgan and A. K. Chesterton, but in the 1931 General Election none of the New Party's candidates were elected. In January 1932 Mosley met Benito Mussolini in Italy. Mosley was impressed by Mussolini's achievements and when he returned to England he disbanded the New Party and replaced it with the British Union of Fascists.
From Nony
History
Shackleton - Ernest Shackleton and the Endurance expedition, preparation - Ernest Shackleton's Trans-Antarctica expedition of 1914 - 1917 is one of the most incredible adventure stories of all time. It is remarkable even for an era and region that already has far more than its fair share of incredible tales of heroism and fortitude in the face of appalling hardships.
From Nony
History
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Hundreds of Awesome Vintage Sea Flags hidden away in a Museum | Messy Nessy Chic - It’s amazing what secret treasures museums don’t display. Hidden away in the back rooms of the National Maritime Museum in Greenwich, England are 1000’s of flags used to identify navy vessels and shipping lines throughout history. The museum is constrained by conservation and space resources but they’ve done a very good job of documenting most of them in an online archive I stumbled upon today. Graphic designers, flag lovers, sea voyagers feast your eyes…
From Nony
History
History
cyberneticzoo.com - a history of cybernetic animals and early robots - a history of cybernetic animals and early robots
From Nony
History
Object of Intrigue: The Most Beautiful Banknote in U.S. History | Atlas Obscura - Art and money have a complicated relationship in America. But art on money has always been pretty simple: Put a dead president on the front of a note, some numbers and a seal on the back, and cover the whole thing in a lot of squiggly lines to make it harder for people to print their own cash.
From Nony
History
A Complete Ottoman Soldier's Camel Found In an Austrian Basement - Researchers excavated the first complete skeleton of a camel in central Europe — one that may have started out life in the army and ended it as a curiosity.
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History
Perry Rosen, Jukebox Repairman: A Baby Boomer's Love of Jukeboxes - The Atlantic - In this short documentary, filmmakers Alden Nusser and Patrick Donachie profile Perry Rosen, one of America's few remaining jukebox technicians. Rosen, whose Sheepshead Bay home is lined with a half-dozen Wurlitzers and Rock-Olas, says that he can repair any variety of jukebox "from the 1930s right up to the year 2000." Who knew they still made these things that recently?
From Nony
History
Roger Wilkerson, The Suburban Legend! - Fun with the Mid-Century everyman!
From Nony
History
The Questions People Asked Advice Columnists in the 1690s - The Atlantic - In a story about the origins of confessional apps like Whisper and the now-defunct Secret, I recently mentioned The Athenian Mercury, a British periodical of the 1690s that is widely credited with inventing the modern advice column. "I would honestly love to read a compilation of questions
From Nony
|| 05/05/2015 ||
History
SPITFIRE P9374 - The remarkable story of the discovery and reconstruction of a Supermarine Spitfire
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30 Interesting Vintage Pictures when Coca-Cola Comes to France in 1950 - Coca-Cola's first bottling plant in Asia opened in the Philippines in 1912, and first bottling plant in Europe opened in France in 1919. Aaccording to Retronaut, after the war Coke decided to raise its profile and capitalize on the proliferation of refrigerators in French homes. In 1950, the Coca-Cola company decided the people of France were ready for the great taste of Coke.
From Nony
|| 05/02/2015 ||
History
Friends of the Hunley -
From Nony
History
History
Elbe Day: A hand-shake that made history - Elbe Day, April 25, 1945, is the day Soviet and American troops met at the River Elbe, near Torgau in Germany. This contact between the Soviets, advancing from the East, and the Americans, advancing from the West, meant that the two powers had effectively cut Germany in two.
From Nony
History
|| 04/25/2015 ||
History
Waffen Arsenal -
From Nony
|| 04/23/2015 ||
History
The Wolf's Lair - lots of pics/clips of hitler for those interested
From Nony
|| 04/23/2015 ||
History
The First Apple Homepage - Last week I happened across a blog post showing the history of Apple.com over the past 17 years, complete with screenshots culled from the very earliest days of the Internet Archive Wayback Machine. It’s a serious trip down memory lane, but it didn’t go back far enough. This is the earliest mirror of Apple.com, captured shortly after the Wayback Machine went live:
From Nony
History
This 19th Century 'Stench Map' Shows How Smells Reshaped New York City - CityLab - During the 19th century, it was widely believed that bad smells carried diseases. In the 1870s, the New York City Metropolitan Board of Health created the below "stench map" to point out where malodorous industries—then called "offensive trades"—were located in the city.
From Nony
History
The Thirteen Legendary Treasures of Britain | Ancient Origins - The ancient Greek writer Hesiod once wrote that there were five ages of mankind – the Golden Age, the Silver Age, the Bronze Age, the Heroic Age, and the Iron Age. Similarly, in Hinduism, there are four different epochs – the Satya Yuga, Treta Yuga, Dwapar Yuga and Kali Yuga. In both Greek mythology and Hinduism, the ages preceding our present age is described as much more pleasant, with humanity experiencing deterioration over the ages. Likewise, in early British legends, it is said that the British Isles were, in a bygone age, the home of gods and heroes. Although these figures no longer dwell on the British Isles, legends sprung up about the magical objects these beings left behind.
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History of the KKK: Membership application from the 1920s. - This application to join the Ku Klux Klan, printed by the Ku Klux Press, was mailed to people whose friends had identified them as good prospects for membership. The application starts with fairly anodyne questions about occupation and residence, moving on to ask whether the applicant believes in white supremacy and “the principles of a PURE Americanism.”
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History
The Photographs of Roger Fenton, 1852 - 1860 - The photographic career of Roger Fenton (1819-1869) lasted only eleven years, but during that time he became the most famous photographer in Britain. Part of the second generation of photographers who came to maturity in the 1850s—only a decade after the process was invented—Fenton strove to elevate the new medium to the status of a fine art and to establish it as a respected profession. He was the first official photographer to the British Museum and one of the founders of the Photographic Society, later named the Royal Photographic Society, an organization he hoped would help establish the medium's importance in modern life.
From Nony
History
History
Photos of 1910 Great Flood of Paris - The 1910 Great Flood of Paris was a catastrophe in which the Seine River, carrying winter rains from its tributaries, flooded Paris, France, and several nearby communities.
From Nony
|| 03/29/2015 ||
History
retrowar -
From Nony
History
vintage everyday: 45 Astonishing Photos of Daily Life in the Ghetto of Warsaw in the Summer of 1941 - The Warsaw Ghetto was the largest of all the Jewish ghettos in Nazi-occupied Europe during World War II.
From Nony
|| 03/27/2015 ||
History
Derek Ridgers Club Kids - In the early 1980s, against a backdrop of grey skies, recession and Thatcherism, a colourful new tribe emerged on the streets of Soho. The point of assembly was an unassuming wine bar that, every Tuesday night, became the cathedral to their new culture. The Blitz Club found itself at the centre of a new youth culture that would eventually be coined New Romantic, but back in the tentative beginnings was only known as the Blitz Kids.
From Nony
History
|| 03/23/2015 ||
History
|| 03/22/2015 ||
History
Guns Gas and Trenches - "War is all - fighting is all - everything else is cropped away"-- Ernst Junger
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The World War II Multimedia Database | For the 72 Million - More than any other war in human history, the Second World War was a war of advancing technology. Incredible advances changed the very nature of the warfare forever.
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History
D-Day's Legacy: Remnants of invasion linger in beach sands | EARTH Magazine - Before dawn on June 6, 1944, more than 160,000 Allied troops began storming the shores of Normandy, France, in what would be the turning point of World War II. Troops poured out of planes and off ships along an 80-kilometer stretch of coastline. More than 5,000 ships and 13,000 airplanes supported the ground troops. The battles were bloody and brutal, but by day’s end, the Allies had established a beachhead. Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower said the operation was a crusade in which “we will accept nothing less than full victory.” Less than a year later, the Germans surrendered, and the Western Front of World War II came to an end.
From Nony
|| 03/14/2015 ||
History
Poirtland. - Pacific War, naval ships, guns, torpedoes, WWII in general, and things.
From Nony
|| 03/13/2015 ||
History
Auguste François - Having completed his studies in Law, Auguste François (1857-1935) began a diplomatic career that led him to work in French Ministry of Internal Affairs, then in Ministry of External Affairs. In 1886, he volunteered to accompany the French physiologist and diplomat Paul Bert in Tonkin. Since then he had kept on moving back and forth through the Middle Kingdom, while travelling to other countries. He became Consul-General and was appointed Delegate to the Yunnan railway Commission in charge of negotiating with Chinese authorities the construction of the Laokay-Yunnanfu railway, which linked Southern China and North Indochina. Between 1896 and 1904, he travelled across Southern China (Yunnan, Guangxi, Sichuan) and Tibet, and navigated through the Yangtze River. He has left us today over hundreds of photographs that captured daily life in China, magnificent landscapes, while questioning customs and the gradual modernization of a traditional society. Auguste François’ photographic archives are mainly held at the Musée Guimet (Paris).
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History
#TBT: A Weekly Photography Archive Dive (Feb. 26) - Photo Journal - WSJ - In this photo from Feb. 26, 1993, two New York City police officers help a woman away from the scene of a bombing at the World Trade Center. Twenty-two years ago, a group of terrorists detonated explosives in an underground parking garage under one of the towers, killing six people and ushering in an era of terrorism on American soil.
From Nony
|| 02/26/2015 ||
History
World War II in pictures - World War II in pictures
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History
The Last Shell Oil Clamshell Station | Atlas Obscura - Although Winston-Salem, North Carolina is known more for tobacco than oil, it is home to the last Shell Oil clamshell station in the United States. Located on the quiet corner of Sprague and Peachtree Streets, the station sits abandoned, its two tall pumps now no more than curiosities.
From Nony
History
History
Developing 31 Rolls Of Lost World War II Film - The Rescued Film Project came into 31 rolls shot by the same soldier during World War II. The process is grueling, but the results were worth it.
From Nony
History
Detroit in the 1940s - The Atlantic - The early part of the 20th century saw the city of Detroit, Michigan, rise to prominence on the huge growth of the auto industry and related manufacturers. The 1940s were boom years of development, but the decade was full of upheaval and change, as factories re-tooled to build war machines, and women started taking on men's roles in the workplace, as men shipped overseas to fight in World War II. The need for workers brought an influx of African-Americans to Detroit, who met stiff resistance from whites who refused to welcome them into their neighborhoods or work beside them on an assembly line. A race riot took place over three days in 1943, leaving 34 dead and hundreds injured. After World War II ended, the demand for workers dried up, and Detroit started plotting its postwar course, an era of big automobiles and bigger highways to accommodate them.
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The Story Behind The Most Famous Picture From World War II - All Day - The flag raising at Iwo Jima on Feb. 23, 1945 is not only the most famous picture from World War II, it’s one of the most iconic images ever captured in the history of photography. Often parodied, honored, and recreated, the story of this picture really is worth 1,000 words.
From Nony
|| 02/22/2015 ||
History
|| 02/22/2015 ||
History
Dem Deutschen Volke - Dedicated to the World Wars, the Interwar period, Militarism, the Third Reich, National Socialism, Fascism, History, and more. You may occasionally find posts about Beauty(which may or may not involve Nudity), the Middle Ages, Arts, Paganism. If any...
From Nony
History
A History Of The Most Impractical Weapons Ever Used In War - A lot of brainpower goes into designing weapons of war. Unfortunately, in a complicated situation, brainpower is a terrible substitute for testing. Here are some of the ingenious weapons of war that were great on paper and terrible in practice
From Nony
History
Great Republican Harrison and Morton, campaign ball. - Great Republican Harrison and Morton, campaign ball. The phrase "get the ball rolling" comes from a publicity campaign that began in 1840 with rowdy men and boys rolling a large ball from town-to-town to bring attention to their candidate. 1888. [1209x1920
From Nony
History
Early Stick-and-Poke Prison Tattoos Preserved In Formaldehyde - Nowadays, it’s not uncommon to see people with copious amounts of tattoos on their arms, legs, and head. But, it wasn’t that long ago that these permanent adornments were only found on a very specific group of people – prisoners. Tattoos back then were markedly different than their modern counterparts, and some were preserved for posterity in formaldehyde. The tiny pieces of history are an eerie but a fascinating look at the past.
From Nony
|| 02/07/2015 ||
History
Historical Nonfiction -
From Nony
|| 02/06/2015 ||
History
Letters of Note -
From Nony
History
vintage everyday: Women of the Future Trading Cards, 1902 - This set concentrates on the possible occupations of women in the future, and printed in 1902 by A. Bergertet in Nancy, France. The images are slightly odd, most being a little on the "swimsuit issue" side, but then again not without the women exhibiting a kind of coy pride in spite of what they looked like...
From Nony
History
Medieval Speech Bubbles | medievalbooks - The drawing from c. 1300 shows a group of people walking, some of them with a walking stick in their hand. You can almost hear the sing-songs in the background. As it turns out, this merry scene bears more than one parallel to a modern comic book story.
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The Suffragette and Fascist Mary Richardson and the Rokeby Venus at the National Gallery | Flashbak - In June 1934 at an anti-fascist gathering at Trafalgar Square a 52 year old Sylvia Pankhurst angrily denounced Blackshirt violence. It had been only three weeks since Oswald Mosley and the British Union of Fascists had held their huge staged rally at Olympia for which the Daily Mail had offered free tickets to readers who sent in letters explaining ‘Why I like the Blackshirts’.
From Nony
|| 01/20/2015 ||
History
Waffen Arsenal - A bit obsessed with German WWII stuff
From Nony
|| 01/20/2015 ||
History
Soviet Postcards -
From Nony
History
History
Louisiana plantation museum to focus on harsh realities of slavery - Life-size sculptures of slave children haunt the clapboard church on the grounds of the old sugar cane plantation, where ceramic heads of black men will soon sway on pikes in the Louisiana breeze.Unlike other plantation museums along the Great River Road between New Orleans and Baton Rouge, the newly opened and under-construction Whitney Plantation focuses squarely on the plight of slaves.
From Nony
History
Software Library: MS-DOS Games : Free Software : Download & Streaming : Internet Archive - Software for MS-DOS machines that represent entertainment and games. The collection includes action, strategy, adventure and other unique genres of game and entertainment software. Through the use of the EM-DOSBOX in-browser emulator, these programs are bootable and playable. Please be aware this browser-based emulation is still in beta
From Nony
History
vintage everyday: Santa Claus's Plane at Seaton Delaval, Northumberland, 1934 - This collection of photographs documents the arrival of Santa Claus's plane at Northumberland. Santa can be seen arriving via plane in a field at Seaton Delaval, Northumberland. He is greeted by a crowd of excited children who then go on to parade with him to the local High Street for gifts and music.
From Nony
History
Apocalypse Then: How Britain Scrambled to Protect Its Art From Nuclear War in the 1980s - Bloomberg - In the early 1980s, the world was gripped by thoughts of nuclear war. Soviet leaders were convinced the U.S. and its allies were on the brink of a pre-emptive strike. In Britain, museum officials were worrying about what, in the event of apocalypse, they should do with all their paintings.
From Nony
|| 12/28/2014 ||
History
History In Posters -
From Nony
History
HOLIDAY SPECIAL: Watch a 104-year-old film adaptation of Charles Dickens A Christmas Carol - Director J. Searle Dawley’s silent film adaptation of Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol is as economical — it delivers the story of Ebenezer Scrooge’s journey to redemption in a brisk 10 minutes — as it is underrated.
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|| 12/24/2014 ||
History
|| 12/24/2014 ||
History
B-29 “Enola Gay” - B-29 “Enola Gay”
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History
The Monsters of Christmas | Atlas Obscura - Many of the ancient pagan observances during midwinter have been transformed or forgotten by our modern society. If you look into the origins of traditions practiced around Christmas today, you might be surprised to discover that the Christmas pastimes you know so well are themselves teeming with the macabre and strange.
From Nony
History
History
History
Historic Architecture & Landscape Image Collection | The Art Institute of Chicago - Consisting of approximately 11,000 images that document the architecture, landscape and urban planning of sites across the United States—with a particular emphasis on Chicago and its suburbs—and, to a lesser extent, internationally, The Historic Architecture and Landscape Image collection, or HALIC, contains mounted photographic prints, lantern slides (both black and white and hand-colored), and postcards dating from the 1860s to the 1970s.
From Nony
History
History
Israel acknowledges Jews in fact Khazars; Secret plan for migration to Ukraine - A blue-ribbon team of scholars from leading research institutions and museums has just issued a secret report to the government, acknowledging that European Jews are in fact Khazars.
From Roddy
History
History
Researchers unearth new clues about ancient ‘computer’ - The Antikythera Mechanism, an ancient machine dubbed “the world’s first computer,” was recovered from a treasure-laden shipwreck off the coast of Greece in 1901. However, the latest research by James Evans, professor of physics at the University of Puget Sound, and Christián Carman, history of science professor at the University of Quilmes, Argentina, sheds new light on the clocklike astronomical mechanism. The study, published in the Archive for History of Exact Science, pinpoints the date when the mechanism was timed to begin as 205 B.C., making it 50 to 100 years older than previously thought
From Supreeth
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|| 11/28/2014 ||
History
|| 11/27/2014 ||
History
Lock, Stock, and History - Historic and antique firearms, curiosities, and miscellaneous history.
From Nony
History
Hitlers former food taster reveals the horrors of the Wolfs Lair - Every meal could have been her last. And when she had finished eating the bland vegetarian dishes put before her, 25-year-old Margot Wölk and her young female colleagues would burst into tears and “cry like dogs” because they were grateful still to be alive.
Margot Wölk was no Nazi, but she was one of 15 young women who were employed at Adolf Hitler’s heavily guarded Prussian “Wolf’s Lair” headquarters during the Second World War. Her job was to taste the Nazi leader’s food before it reached his lips, to make sure it wasn’t poisoned.
From Nony
|| 11/18/2014 ||
History
THE LEGACY OF THE 1914 - 18 WAR - 2014 marks the 100th anniversary of the outbreak of World War 1: a pivotal time for Europe and a key transition point for medical science. The Lancet marks this centenary with a three part series ‘Legacy of the war 1914-1918’. The three papers examine the impact of World War 1 on infectious disease, military psychiatry, and amputation related pain. Accompanying the Series is an original research article describing a genetic analysis of a Shigella strain isolated in 1915, and a Case Report of the soldier from whom this strain was isolated.
From Nony
History
|| 11/14/2014 ||
History
Völkertafel - Imgur -
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History
Baptists 'humbled' by failure to oppose Nazis - The 80th anniversary of a courageous stand by Christians in Germany who opposed Adolf Hitler also marks a sad chapter in Baptist history that festered four decades before Baptists voiced repentance.
From Nony
|| 11/06/2014 ||
History
Cure for Drunks -
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History
100-year-old notebook found encased in Antarctic ice is part of Robert Scott's expedition team : SCIENCE : Tech Times - Robert Scott was a British explorer who died with his several of his companions on his second expedition to the Antarctic due to starvation, exhaustion and the extremely cold weather. More than 100 years after his death, an artifact from his ill-fated Terra Nova Expedition of 1910-1913 has emerged.
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History
Century old Antarctic Expedition Notebook Found Underneath Ice | Wall Street OTC - The Antarctic Heritage Trust has come across an incredible discovery of a notebook sheathed under the ice layers in an Antarctic hut that offers a close insight to the last expedition ‘1910-1913 Terra Nova Expedition’ of legendary British explorer Robert F. Scott after 100 years of his passing.
From Anawaram
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History
|| 10/19/2014 ||
History
New-York Historical Society - Explore four centuries of history and art at the New-York Historical Society. Need a high-resolution reproduction of something you see here? Send an e-mail to
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History
Seventeen Fabulous John Hinde Butlin Postcards c.1970 - n the late 1960s and early 1970s, the prestigious John Hinde Studio, based in Dublin, produced a series of elaborately staged photographs that were made into popular postcards - sold at Butlins holiday camps throughout the UK. In those days more than a million Britons had a holiday at Butlins every year. Three photographers, two German (Elmar Ludwig and Edmund Nägele) and one British (David Noble) took photographs to Hinde’s detailed and meticulous instructions. Each photograph utilised a large casts of real holidaymakers acting out roles in huge, beautifully lit ‘narrative tableaux’ of Beachcomber bars, gardens, outdoor swimming pools, ballrooms and snooker halls. The Somerset born Hinde sold his company in 1972 to pursue his love of painting.
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History
vintage everyday: Before there were Hippies, there were Beatniks - Before there were Hippies, there were Beatniks. Beatniks were followers of the Beat Generation - influential poets and authors through the late 1940s to the early '60s. Jack Kerouac came up with the "beat generation" concept - the underground, anti-conformist youth gathering in New York that he was a part of. He also related the term to the Biblical beatitudes and the hipster phrase of being "beaten down". Though at first Beatniks had a prophet-like connotation, the term came to signify a stereotype of people that, as Joyce Johnson (a Beat writer) said: "sold books, sold black turtleneck sweaters and bongos, berets and dark glasses, sold a way of life that seemed like dangerous fun—thus to be either condemned or imitated." They were anti-materialistic, soul searching people, open to drugs and a bohemian lifestyle. They hung out in smoky coffeehouses, listened to jazz and blues, were usually proficient in art or poetry, liked to dress in all-black, and had an air of mysteriousness about them. They highly influenced culture of the decades following - Bob Dylan, the Beatles, and Pink Floyd took on Beatnik characteristics and morphed in to free-thinking hippies. Allen Ginsberg led the way for the conversion
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History
These Were the First Wildlife Photographs Published in National Geographic - Did you know that after National Geographic published its first wildlife photographs in July 1906, two of the National Geographic Society board members “resigned in disgust“? They argued that the reputable magazine was “turning into a ‘picture book’”.
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History
Harvard Class Day: Harvard Klass Kow & Klans -... - Historical Times - Harvard Class Day: Harvard Klass Kow
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History
How To Train A Woman - A 1940s Factory Brochure - IN the 1940s women were amancipated. But the bosses were men. Could they handle the new female recruits? Well, with training. This booklet that was intended to “assist male bosses in supervising their new female employees at RCA plants”.
From Nony
|| 09/21/2014 ||
History
History
History
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History
Locked up for 40 years, the terrace that time forgot - Agents called to sell a Paddington terrace recently were greeted with an astonishing sight: a perfectly preserved time capsule.Most of the house in Brown Street had been locked up for 39 years and accessed only for the occasional dusting of the furniture.
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History
40 maps that explain the Roman Empire - Two thousand years ago, on August 19, 14 AD, Caesar Augustus died. He was Rome's first emperor, having won a civil war more than 40 years earlier that transformed the dysfunctional Roman Republic into an empire. Under Augustus and his successors, the empire experienced 200 years of relative peace and prosperity. Here are 40 maps that explain the Roman Empire — its rise and fall, its culture and economy, and how it laid the foundations of the modern world.
From Nony
|| 08/16/2014 ||
History
Into the Woodstock Crowd, 1969 - Forty five years ago today, nearly half a million music lovers descended upon a dairy farm in the Catskills for three days of peace, love and rock’n’roll. The year was 1969 and a total of 32 bands performed at the event that would make music history. But today, we’re veering away from the stages that Hendrix and Joplin immortalised and venturing into the crowd; the muddy fields, the leafy woods that shielded naked bottoms and the green hills turned parking lots where the flower children, beatniks, hippies, yippies and music lovers spent three days celebrating their youth.
From Nony
|| 08/15/2014 ||
History
Social Security History - This is an archival or historical document and may not reflect current policies or procedures.
This section contains images of posters, pamphlets, and other materials that SSA has made available over the years as part of its various public information campaigns.
From Nony
History
Derinkuyu & The Underground Cities of Cappadocia - In 1963, a man in the Nevşehir Province of Turkey knocked down a wall of his home. Behind it, he discovered a mysterious room. The man continued digging and soon discovered an intricate tunnel system with additional cave-like rooms. What he had discovered was the ancient Derinkuyu underground city, part of the Cappadocia region in central Anatolia, Turkey.
From Nony
History
Medieval Manuscripts Depict A Terrifying Tale Of The Walking Dead - And you thought zombie comics were a recent idea? Over the centuries, medieval artists applied their talents to illustrate a mysterious tale of animated corpses who tormented the living.
From Nony
History
|| 08/11/2014 ||
History
America by Air -
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History
Israel Almost Became a Communist State - Elliott Roosevelt, son of Pres. Franklin Roosevelt, wrote in his book, As He Saw It, that when his father met with our ally, King Faud of Saudi Arabia in 1944, Roosevelt promised that he would not support a Jewish state in Palestine.However, this policy changed under President Truman who sought Jewish votes in the major cities.Truman, backed by the World Zionist Congress, lobbied U.N. members to vote in favor of establishing a Jewish state in Palestine. On Nov. 26, 1947 the motion was defeated by a vote of 32 to 25. The pressure was intense to have the opponents change their vote. With Soviet support the vote switched on Nov. 29, 1947 to 33 in favor and 24 opposed.Stalin and Truman were then in a race to be the first to officially recognize the new Jewish state. Truman beat Stalin by just hours. The U.S. Communist Party celebrated and in New York City some two-thirds of their members were Jews.
From Nony